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Showing posts from April, 2016

Guest Post: Play It As It Lays reviewed by Joseph Brinson

You know, I began a try at this review writing about Iago in Othello and the nature of evil.

And about ennui and apathy.

And that the answer is: nothing.

And how I felt deep empathy for Maria.

And then I deleted it all.

This is my review: This novel depressed the fuck out of me.

That, and giving it four stars, should sum it up.






















Joseph Brinson (a.k.a., "Quixada"), a poet and a longtime online pal, made me fucking howl when I first read his deadpanned piece on Play It As It Lays years and years ago.  Yes, it is brief — yet is playfully, skillfully thorough. His homage still slays me today.

Reading Ulysses One Page a Day: Pages 26-30

006 ... In which I continue reading Ulysses one page per day, and quote both my favorite sentence and favorite word from each day's reading. Each post chronicles five days.


Day 26; pg 26

Stephen’s embarrassed hand moved over the shells heaped in the cold stone mortar: whelks and money cowries and leopard shells: and this, whorled as an emir’s turban, and this, the scallop of saint James.

f.w. = thong

—o—

Day 27; pg 27

Do you know that the orange lodges agitated for repeal of the union twenty years before O’Connell did or before the prelates of your communion denounced him as a demagogue?

Iago makes an appearance on pg 27.  Iago also appeared on the first page of Joan Didion's sizzling second novel Play It As It Lays. I wonder where else that ego-tripping imp Iago has appeared in contemporary literature?  Put but money in thy purse, Dear!  Money is power!!

f.w. = filibegs

—o—

Day 28; pg 28

But prompt ventilation of this allimportant question ... Where Cranly led me to get rich quick, h…

Reading Ulysses One Page a Day: Pages 21-25

005 ... In which I read James Joyce's Ulysses one page per day, one day at a time, and chronicle my reading by quoting my favorite sentence and favorite word ("f.w.") from each page. Each post chronicles five days of reading.


Day 21; pg 21

For them too history was a tale like any other too often heard, their land a pawnshop.

Another "all"-one-word-sentence occurs on this pg.  A general's spear is prominent.  As is Pyrrhus, pier.  Lots of letter "p" wordplay.

f.w. = gorescarred.

—<>—

Day 22; pg 22

Fed and feeding brains about me: under glowlamps, impaled, with faintly beating feelers: and in my mind’s darkness a sloth of the underworld, reluctant, shy of brightness, shifting her dragon scaly folds..

f.w. = Genevieve

I was recently discussing the topics of Time and Ghosts with friends, just the day before, in fact, that I read this page. Check out how pg 22 opens below —

Had Pyrrhus not fallen by a beldam’s hand in Argos or Julius Caesar not been kn…

Reading Ulysses One Page a Day: Pages 16-20

004 ... in which I continue reading Ulysses one page per day one day at a time, and chronicle my reading by quoting my favorite sentence and word from each page. Each post chronicles five days of reading.


Day 16; pg 16




The seas’ ruler, he gazed southward over the bay, empty save for the smokeplume of the mailboat vague on the bright skyline and a sail tacking by the Muglins.

Hard to decide on a favorite word; it's either smokeplume or Muglins (and this, I think, is the first occurrence for me in which the sentence I chose also holds my favorite word).
—<>—

Day 17; pg 17

—The ballad of joking Jesus, Stephen answered.

Jarring sentence!  I allmost chose the sentence All.  Not just any writer can write a one-word sentence that fits the context of the narrative in both a stylistic/aesthetic sense and thematically.  The word "all" is used many times on this page.  Do you believe at all, Haines is asking Dedalus, even if you don't believe it all?

f.w. = waistcoatpocket.  …